How a Return to Multigenerational Living is Shifting the Housing Market

CURBED

By Patrick Sisson

Donna Butts remembers one of the moments that sold her on the idea that there was a sustained rise in the number of multigenerational households. As executive director of Generations United, a nonprofit that promotes intergenerational living, she was called to do an interview on the topic for a Louisiana radio station a few years ago. The host seemed wedded to stereotypes: He’d never want his mother-in-law to move in, since she’d be intrusive and annoying, and adult kids living with their parents were strictly a sign of spoiled millennials.

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Michael Anderson
Michael Anderson 249 posts

Over the course of his 30-year career, Michael Anderson has worked in the residential development industry in the Pacific Northwest, Northern California and Southern California. He has acquired residential land in excess of $300M for both land development and homebuilding entities and has overseen the construction of approximately 2500 homes. Currently, in semi-retirement, and based out of Newport Beach, CA, Michael continues to invest in and stay abreast of the land markets.

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