How San Diego’s Homebuilding Slump Compares to the Rest of SoCal

San Diego Tribune

By Philip Molnar

San Diego County is on track to build fewer homes than it did last year, said permit records released this week. Residential building permits for all homes — condos, apartments and single-family homes — are down 18 percent in the first nine months of 2017 compared to the same time last year, said the Real Estate Research Council of Southern California.

The only county with slower building was Orange County, which had a 21 percent reduction. All other Southern California counties had an increase in building in the first three quarters.

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Michael Anderson
Michael Anderson 249 posts

Over the course of his 30-year career, Michael Anderson has worked in the residential development industry in the Pacific Northwest, Northern California and Southern California. He has acquired residential land in excess of $300M for both land development and homebuilding entities and has overseen the construction of approximately 2500 homes. Currently, in semi-retirement, and based out of Newport Beach, CA, Michael continues to invest in and stay abreast of the land markets.

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